Biological control of postharvest diseases

theory and practice
  • 182 Pages
  • 2.31 MB
  • 3636 Downloads
  • English

CRC Press , Boca Raton
Fruit -- Postharvest diseases and injuries -- Biological control., Vegetables -- Postharvest diseases and injuries -- Biological con
Statementedited by Charles L. Wilson and Michael E. Wisniewski.
ContributionsWilson, Charles L., Wisniewski, Michael E.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsSB608.F8 B56 1994
The Physical Object
Pagination182 p. :
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL1422843M
ISBN 100849345677
LC Control Number93033268

Attack mechanisms of pathogens and defense mechanisms of the host are examined as are treatments aimed at suppressing postharvest diseases. The search for natural and safe chemical compounds and the variety of alternative physical and biological methods for use in postharvest disease control are emphasized.

activity Agricultural Research Service antibiotic antifungal application Armillaria Bacillus subtilis bacteria biocontrol agents biological control agents Botrytis cinerea brown rot cells Chalutz chemical chitosan citrus colonization commercial commodities conidia control of postharvest control postharvest crops culture decay control disease control diseases of fruits Droby.

In their book on biological control, Cook and Baker () provided only one example of the biocontrol of postharvest disease of a fruit or vegetable. This was research by Tronsmo and Dennis () in which Trichoderma was used to con-trol Botrytis rot of strawberry.

Subsequently, Wilson and Pusey ()presented. Background The yeast Biological control of postharvest diseases book fructicola is an antagonist with biological control activity against postharvest diseases of several fruits.

An important number of antagonists have been shown to control main postharvest diseases of hosts such as apples, peaches, citrus fruit, pears and nectarines. In contrast, few antagonists for biological control of postharvest diseases of vegetables have been by: Chapter Biological Control.

Isolation and selection of antagonists. Introduction of antagonists for disease control. Mode of action of the antagonist. Antagonist mixtures to improve disease biocontrol. Combined treatments to improve disease control. Integration into postharvest strategies. Chapter Novel Approaches for Enhancing Host Resistance.

Biological Control of Postharvest Diseases of Fruits. Biological Control of Postharvest Diseases of Vegetables. Biological Control of Seed Spoilage. Mechanisms of Biocontrol. Enhancement of Efficiency of Biocontrol Agents.

Formulation of Biocontrol Agents. Natural Compounds. Summary. Appendix. References.

Description Biological control of postharvest diseases FB2

Several postharvest disease control means alternative to conventional chemical fungicides, such as organic and inorganic salts, will be highlighted in the proposed chapter. In particular, it will comprehensively cover different aspects of the use of salts against postharvest Penicillium decay of citrus.

It will be an essential resource for the graduate and postgraduate students, Author: Khamis Youssef, Kamel A. Abd-Elsalam, Ahmed Hussien, Simona i, Antonio Ippolito. Part of the Handbook of Plant Disease Management book series (HPDM) Pre- and postharvest disease control for ornamental plants is mainly provided via fungicide or bactericide application.

However, disease control with conventional chemical compounds carries the risk of resistance development by new pathogen races. Diseases, physiological disorders, fruit senescence and physical damages represent the major causes of postharvest losses. Postharvest citrus decay is the most severe cause of wastage and quality deterioration since it renders fresh fruit unsuitable for consumption, causing consequently heavy economic by: 7.

Biological control of postharvest diseases (BCPD) has emerged as an effective alternative. Because wound-invading necrotrophic pathogens are vulnerable to biocontrol, antagonists can be applied directly to the targeted area (fruit wounds), and a single application using existing delivery systems.

The “first generation” of biological controls for postharvest spoilage relied on the use of single antagonists.

Perhaps it is unrealistic for us to expect disease control comparable to synthetic fungicides by the use of single by:   Biological control strategies are emerging as promising alternatives to the use of synthetic fungicides.

Several antagonistic microorganisms have been found that can effectively inhibit postharvest diseases of fruits and vegetables.

Details Biological control of postharvest diseases FB2

This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check by: The Chemical Control of Postharvest Diseases: Subtropical and Tropical Fruits Joseph W. Eckert and Joseph M. Ogawa Annual Review of Phytopathology The Chemical Control of Postharvest Diseases: Deciduous Fruits, Berries, Vegetables and Root/Tuber Crops Joseph W.

Eckert and Joseph M. OgawaCited by:   Biological Control of Plant Diseases presents up-to-date research findings on disease management to provide you with a single-source reference text for developing a sustainable ecosystem that doesn’t depend on harmful and unhealthy agrochemicals.

This unique book acts as a catalyst for change. Biological Control of Plant Diseases presents up-to-date research findings on disease management to provide you with a single-source reference text for developing a sustainable ecosystem that doesn’t depend on harmful and unhealthy agrochemicals.

Extensive research has been done in recent years to reduce the heavy dependence on chemical fungicides to control postharvest diseases and disorders of horticultural crops.

Alternative strategies were based on improved cultural practices, biological control, plant-defense promoters, and physical treatments such as UV illumination, radiofrequency treatment, heat Cited by:   Highlighting the day-to-day challenges of organic crop management for cost-effective real-world application, the book explores the biological control of diseases in 12 major crops.

It focuses on the use of host plant resistance through transgenics and induced systemic resistance as a part of biological by: fungicides to control postharvest fruit diseases. The research in biological control using antagonistic microorganisms has been developed as an important food safety alternative.

Biocontrol of postharvest products has the advantage to be in a controlled environment which can be manipulated to favor the biocontrol by: 6. Biological control using antagonists has emerged as one of the most promising alternatives to chemicals to control postharvest diseases.

Since the s, several biocontrol agents (BCAs) have been widely investigated against different pathogens and.

Download Biological control of postharvest diseases PDF

ISBN: OCLC Number: Description: pages: illustrations ; 23 cm: Contents: Ch. Emerging Technologies for the Control of Postharvest Diseases of Fresh Fruits and Vegetables / Joseph Arul --Ch. Microbial Ecology of Fruit and Vegetable Surfaces: Its Relationship to Postharvest Biocontrol / Harvey W.

Spurr, Jr. --Ch. Abstract Losses from postharvest fruit diseases range from 1 to 20 percent in the United States, depending on the commodity.

The application of fungicides to fruits after harvest to reduce decay has been increasingly curtailed by the development of.

Biological Controls for Preventing FoodDeterioration provides readers with options of non-chemical, eco-friendly, environmentally safe natural alternatives to prevent food from spoilage at pre- and postharvest stages.

It covers the. Book Description. Advances in Postharvest Fruit and Vegetable Technology examines how changes in community attitudes and associated pressures on industry are demanding changes in the way technology is used to minimize postharvest loss and maintain product quality.

In particular, the book discusses important drivers for change, including. These mechanisms inhibit phytopathogen growth that affects postharvest fruit since quality and safety parameters are influenced by the action of these microorganisms, which cause production losses in more than 50% of fruit tree species.

The use of synthetic fungicide products has been the dominant control strategy for diseases caused by by: 7. Biological control of postharvest diseases of fruits and vegetables by microbial antagonists: A review. uv-c-induced disease resistance in tomato fruit is a multi-component and time-dependent system (m.t.

charles, j. arul, n. benhamou) metschnikowia andauensis: a novel biocontrol agent of fruit postharvest diseases (t.

manso, c. nunes) restorative biological control - a promising new approach, but can we prove it. Classical and augmentative biological control against diseases and pests: critical status analysis and review of factors Many thanks are expressed to Ute KOCH for her assistance with the lay out of the book.

Contributors. Evolution of the yearly number of publications dedicated to biological control of plant diseases based on a. alternative disease control methods to be sought. Biologi- cal control presents an attractive option. This paper examines the prospects for biological control of post- harvest diseases of fruits and vegetables and recommends future research directions.

Environmental concerns in the s over pesticides,Cited by: With contributions from more than 30 internationally renowned experts, this book combines coverage of theory with coverage of global practices. Highlighting the day-to-day challenges of organic crop management for cost-effective real-world application, the book explores the biological control of diseases in 12 major crops.

Plant Disease Plant Disease Fruit Surface Colonization and Biological Control of Postharvest Diseases of Pear by Preharvest Yeast Applications Jesse M. Benbow and David Sugar, Oregon State University, Southern Oregon Research and Extension Center, Hanley Rd., Medford Chapter 29 (Page no: ) Postharvest biocontrol: new concepts and applications.

Biological control of postharvest products has great potential because postharvest environmental parameters such as temperature and humidity can be rigidly controlled to suit the needs of the biocontrol agent.Novel bacterial isolates are provided for the biological control of post-harvest rot causative organisms, particularly by antagonism to fungal growth.

Particularly the present invention provides novel isolates of bacteria of species Pseudomonas fluorescens, Serratia liquefaciens, Serratia plymuthica, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus pumilis and Bacillus polymyxa which are particularly Cited by: